The Gift: The Form and Reason for Exchange in Archaic Societies

The Gift The Form and Reason for Exchange in Archaic Societies In this his most famous work Marcel Mauss presented to the world a book which revolutionized our understanding of some of the basic structures of society By identifying the complex web of exchange a

  • Title: The Gift: The Form and Reason for Exchange in Archaic Societies
  • Author: Marcel Mauss W.D. Halls Mary Douglas
  • ISBN: 9780415267496
  • Page: 375
  • Format: Paperback
  • In this, his most famous work, Marcel Mauss presented to the world a book which revolutionized our understanding of some of the basic structures of society By identifying the complex web of exchange and obligation involved in the act of giving, Mauss called into question many of our social conventions and economic systems In a world rife with runaway consumption, The GifIn this, his most famous work, Marcel Mauss presented to the world a book which revolutionized our understanding of some of the basic structures of society By identifying the complex web of exchange and obligation involved in the act of giving, Mauss called into question many of our social conventions and economic systems In a world rife with runaway consumption, The Gift continues to excite and challenge.

    • Best Read [Marcel Mauss W.D. Halls Mary Douglas] ↠ The Gift: The Form and Reason for Exchange in Archaic Societies || [Poetry Book] PDF ↠
      375 Marcel Mauss W.D. Halls Mary Douglas
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      Posted by:Marcel Mauss W.D. Halls Mary Douglas
      Published :2019-08-18T20:09:50+00:00

    One Reply to “The Gift: The Form and Reason for Exchange in Archaic Societies”

    1. I have found myself re-reading Marcel Mauss’s classic treatise on The Gift. It was first published in the 1920s as a series of articles in L’Année Sociologique the journal founded by Mauss’s uncle, Émile Durkheim. And indeed, its spirit is firmly Durkheimian, for it sees the prime role of the gift and the act of giving to be the cementing of the bonds of society. Mauss argues that gifts are a type of exchange. As he nearly says, there is no such thing as a free lunch. The idea that gifts [...]

    2. Utterly impenetrable. I read the translation by Ian Cunnison with an introduction by Evans-Pritchard. The first red flag raced to the top of the flagpole in the Translator's Note before the main event: 'In the French edition the compendious notes were printed on the text pages. Here they are placed after the text and numbered separately by chapters.' Brilliant. Endnotes are detestable things that demand an awkward and arthritic kung-fu hand grip in order to balance the blasted book between your [...]

    3. Marcel Mauss’ “The Gift” (1925) is one of the most influential pieces of anthropology written in the twentieth century. It explores the economies of pre-capitalist cultures and peoples from several different parts of the world, including Melanesia, Polynesia, and the Pacific Northwest. This specific edition, with an introduction by Mary Douglas (a magnificent anthropologist in her own right), is especially recommended, and sheds a tremendous amount of light on Mauss’ sometimes unclear co [...]

    4. Dans Le Don, Marcel Mauss présente la thèse basée en grande partie sur l'étude de Bronislaw Malinowski The Argonauts of the Western Pacific selon laquelle le don réciproque est un élément clé de la société humaine. Ce qui est dérangeant est que Mauss critique Malinowski séverement pour ne pas avoir tiré les mêmes conclusions que lui de ses recherches. Il faut être francais pour avoir autant de culot.Examinons la thèse. Malinowksi avait décrit les voyages de Kùla entrepris sur u [...]

    5. Classic study of gifts, exchange, reciprocity, sacrificial gift giving. Detailed examples from ancient cultures around the world demonstrate the universal importance of customs surrounding giving. I read this during graduate school. The fundamental take away for me, nearly 30 years later, is how little each of us still reflects on the importance of giving, even token or symbolic giving, in keeping the social fabric intact. Humans are social animals and we try to forget how much we need other hum [...]

    6. The Gift is a classic of anthropological literature. Mauss describes gift giving in the context of Melanesian, Polynesian, and Northwest Coast Indian contexts. For Mauss, gift-giving is the keystone element of social cohesion in non-capitalist societies. His argument is both economically evolutionary, and functionalist. Mauss attempts to break down an institution that he considers to represent a "total social phenomenon", that is it to say that it affects political, economic, religious, and ethi [...]

    7. Et pourquoi donc faisons nous (devons-nous faire) des cadeaux à nos proches à certains moments de l'année ? noël, anniversaires, fêtes des mères, des pères, maintenant la fête des grands mèresCet essai cherche a l'expliquer en décrivant les comportements de sociétés anciennes et isolées. Il rapporte les rites du potlatch, pendant lesquels on s'échange des objets, que l'on détruisait à la fin de la fête. Il apporte ainsi un éclairage à nos comportements de consommateurs moderne [...]

    8. Systematic, concise and well researched, Mauss' treatise on reciprocity is a must read for anyone interested in the anthropology or viability of the non-market economy. He details the methods of exchange in the indigenous societies of Melanesia, Polynesia, and the Pacific Northwest, and concludes with its relation to the sociological study of altruism. Giving, according to Mauss is not a strictly selfless behavior, but rather we give to receive, whether directly from the giftee or the universe/s [...]

    9. I understand why so many people like this book now because its incredibly useful for understanding the everyday unconscious issue of receiving gifts, charity and the hurt ego that follows. Its also fascinating to counter-pose his understanding of value, circulation, money, and commodity-fetishism, with Marx's understanding of these phenomena. Like any young person trying to enter the academy I've already thought of a few essay ideas that I can write based on a few observations from this book.

    10. A seasonal reading. Mauss draws on contemporary anthropological data and some historical legal material to conclude there is no such thing as a pure gift, and that this is not a bad thing. Interesting implications for charitable giving.

    11. Informative book that tells you how the concept of money got started. Before Rome, there was trade and an honor code. After Rome, there was money. So much for good faith. It all became about "show me the money, dawg."

    12. hình thức biếu tặng có thể mang lại một xã hội dung hoà, nhưng đôi khi mình thấy nó không tích cực vì hình thức này luôn tạo ra một tư duy có điều kiện.

    13. What I likedMauss is example-based. He backs up the ideas in this book with plentiful evidence from reports written by people on the ground, who actually interacted with the "archaic" societies in question. Such examples clarify his ideas, support his arguments, and, moreover, are quite interesting in themselves.I was suprised and delighted by Mauss's frequent linguistic arguments. He would argue that some concept or behavior in some society was a distant descendant of another concept or behavio [...]

    14. Pros: The book itself is a fascinating look at some cultures that don't get a whole lot of love: the Pacific islands, Melanesia, and Northeast Asia and Northwest America. The subject of the gift was fascinating, I was drawn into the descriptions, and it made me reflect deeply on the nature of "giving" in my own society/life. What do I think about giving? What does giving mean in my culture? etc.Cons: 1. The book is almost 70 years old, and its age is definitely showing. I'm somewhat concerned fo [...]

    15. In this expanded edition of Marcel Mauss seminal work, Jane I. Guyer's translation and annotations provide important contributions to the restoration of Mauss' original framework. Mauss' Essay on the Gift, in this book presented alongside his accounts and reviews of his contemporaries, has been highly influential, but also much misinterpreted, in the social sciences. Guyer's attentiveness to language and context presents this English version in new light. The essay is an exploration of gift exch [...]

    16. Finished it in a day. I don't know if it was because I am fascinated by anthropology or because it's a rather easy read. Mauss explains his perspective of the gift thoroughly and it felt as a university lecture.

    17. I found the premise of this interesting, but ultimately found the style quite oppressive. I may need to return to this as I find the subject of obligatory status based gift exchange extremely interesting, and the potential links into charity are fascinating.

    18. A friend recommended this book to me after I published The Mind Share Market. Since ancient societies people have used informal barter systems, highlighting that regardless of the specific culture there is a sense of moral transactions.

    19. I had to read this for a PhD discussion seminar, didn't see the point of it. I still don't understand why it is praised as one of the most prolific pieces of anthropological work. Which to be fair is my stance on anthropology as a whole.

    20. I needed to read this for a religion class, and I definitely marathoned this because I have to have a discussion about it tomorrow, but it was interesting enough.

    21. “There is no such thing as a free lunch” is an economic theory that the modern world functions upon, while “There is no such thing as a free gift” is how archaic societies have lived according to Mauss’ "Essai Sur le Don: Forme et Raison de l’Échange dans les Sociétés Archaïques" or simply "The Gift," which is written under the influence of Malinowski’s Argonauts of the Western Pacific, and is Mauss’ way to fight against capitalism and utilitarianism, by reading this economic [...]

    22. An interesting book, if a dense one. If you're an anthropology student in any capacity I would highly recommend this one, but give it the time it deserves; it's a deceptively long book. The actual layout of my copy was abysmal. You need to do this weird, carpal tunnel inducing pose with your hand in order to access the notes, and you're going to need to consult them. A good read, but by no means a pleasant one.

    23. This book reminds of this essay I read about whether land should cease to be considered inalienable private property. The Machiavellian bent in Mauss's statement that gifts are never free rouses to mind the ideas of Social Darwinists, who aim at uncovering impulses to survive and procreate belying all the actions of people. I disagree with the implications of his statement but gift economies are particularly salient because of my Panglossian beliefs towards the likelihood that people may collabo [...]

    24. It’s been a long time since I’ve been this deeply torn about a book. On the one hand, Marcel Mauss’s The Gift is an extraordinarily researched, wide ranging and - as I write these words more than a hundred years after it’s publication - rightly recognized work of anthropological invention. On the other hand… actually reading The Gift probably counts as one of the most miserable reading experiences I’ve ever had. It’s not that Mauss’s writing is bad - it’s a little dry, perhaps [...]

    25. The power of gift and gifting eludes most of us, at least in any meaningful sense. We give, we receive, and move on. Or so we'd like to think so. Marcel Mauss a sociologist from the early 1900's shares a rich history as well as the concept of power in our act of giving and receiving. Whether he's intentional or not he highlights the power in the giver as well as the spiritual essence of the gift itself. I think part of his message is that the exchange of gifts is much more meaningful and spiritu [...]

    26. a profoundly beautiful and intellectually humble meditation on the social condition that forwards a possible, more hopeful alternative to the extractive, exploitative nature of capitalism.a must read particularly for students of anthropology.

    27. This book is old and a bit positivist in its approach, but has been referenced by at least two scholars who are important for my dissertation and seems in general to be very seminal in the area of the anthropology of gift exchange. Don't know how much I'll reference this book specifically, but I thought I ought to at least know what Mauss says. I think it's main value is in ridding us of the idea of a "gift" as something that is "freely given", though put that way it sounds negative. Mauss empha [...]

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