For Love Alone

For Love Alone High minded independent imaginative Teresa Hawkins knows only one commandment Thou shalt love Emotionally starved by her ramshackle family Teresa searches for fulfilment outside her stultifying li

  • Title: For Love Alone
  • Author: Christina Stead
  • ISBN: 9780571256136
  • Page: 465
  • Format: Paperback
  • High minded, independent, imaginative, Teresa Hawkins knows only one commandment Thou shalt love Emotionally starved by her ramshackle family, Teresa searches for fulfilment outside her stultifying life as a working girl in a large city Obsessed with love and sex she pins her affection on the first possible object, the egotistical Jonathan Crow, a poverty stricken tutHigh minded, independent, imaginative, Teresa Hawkins knows only one commandment Thou shalt love Emotionally starved by her ramshackle family, Teresa searches for fulfilment outside her stultifying life as a working girl in a large city Obsessed with love and sex she pins her affection on the first possible object, the egotistical Jonathan Crow, a poverty stricken tutor who coaches her in Latin Teresa preserves this love in the face of his indifference, contempt and ill usage, imprisoned by her belief that to love is to give for ever without stint, and not to ask for the slightest thing It is only through another man her ebullient and warm hearted employer James Quick that Teresa comes to understand her power as a woman, and emerges from obsession to a real consciousness of sexuality and love Set in Sydney and London, For Love Alone, first published in 1945, is one of Christina Stead s finest novels Source faber work for love

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    One Reply to “For Love Alone”

    1. A young, intelligent, naive girl trapped by societal convention and family pressures. Grasping for education. Men. The first bad, the second good. A happy ending for the lovers. Marriage perhaps, or kids. This would be the usual form. Trite, uninteresting, unrealistic. Indeed, look at the poster for the (by all accounts awful) movie that got made of it: This, like the front cover of the VMC edition (why could we not have had one of those wonderful paintings!), not only misrepresents the novel co [...]

    2. this was a painful but important read. there were parts i read and read again before moving on, and i'll probably read it again sometime although the end left me feeling cold somehow. i think i liked this book best when teresa's suffering was at its worse, mainly because it felt like surely she was one step away from giving jonathon crow a whack in the face. ultimately i realised he's just too stupidly cynical and emotionally vacant for anything to have that much of an impact on him anyway and s [...]

    3. This is the third novel I've read by Christina Stead. Her writing is fierce, intense and exhausting and her characters are vivid and sometimes grotesque. This novel conveys an amazing impression of Sydney in the thirties and provides a very rich portrayal of the difficulties and frustrations faced by a young, intelligent and sexually aware woman in that era. A great Australian novel, in my opinion (though maybe not for the faint-hearted).

    4. I really do not know what to make of this book. I mean. What.Things that stood out about it:- For the first half, the scenic descriptions of Sydney were spot on. So spot on. Consider this one. That's the main reason I read the book, I was promised modernist sense of place, so I guess it wins on that score.- Good lord Christina Stead's descriptions of the depressed cynical prospectless academic dude. It's like she predicted my terrible taste in men well in advance of my birth.- In theory, I think [...]

    5. I can't rate this one as high as "The Man Who Loved Children" (by the same author) for lack of virtuosity and Jonathan Crow is absolutely insufferable, but I do think it is interesting how this novel depicts a female heroic journey, especially since it was written before the rise of women's lib.

    6. This, I believe, is one of the greatest pieces of Australian literature ever written. Its scope and timlessness is superb, and its structure is astounding.

    7. Absolutely brilliant tale of a highly-strung young woman who allows herself to be lead-on by a sour misogynist.

    8. Two things made this novel a painful experience: I) Jonathan Crow was intolerable & II) I am repulsed by fiction where the author introduces a major character toward the very end (Quick).

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