The Dark Child

The Dark Child The Dark Child is a distinct and graceful memoir of Camara Laye s youth in the village of Koroussa French Guinea Long regarded Africa s preeminent Francophone novelist Laye herein marvels ov

  • Title: The Dark Child
  • Author: Camara Laye Alfred Ernest Jones James Kirkup Philippe Thoby-Marcellin
  • ISBN: 9780809015481
  • Page: 269
  • Format: Paperback
  • The Dark Child is a distinct and graceful memoir of Camara Laye s youth in the village of Koroussa, French Guinea Long regarded Africa s preeminent Francophone novelist, Laye 1928 80 herein marvels over his mother s supernatural powers, his father s distinction as the village goldsmith, and his own passage into manhood, which is marked by animistic beliefs and bloody riThe Dark Child is a distinct and graceful memoir of Camara Laye s youth in the village of Koroussa, French Guinea Long regarded Africa s preeminent Francophone novelist, Laye 1928 80 herein marvels over his mother s supernatural powers, his father s distinction as the village goldsmith, and his own passage into manhood, which is marked by animistic beliefs and bloody rituals of primeval origin Eventually, he must choose between this unique place and the academic success that lures him to distant cities More than autobiography of one boy, this is the universal story of sacred traditions struggling against the encroachment of a modern world A passionate and deeply affecting record, The Dark Child is a classic of African literature.

    The Dark Child by Camara Laye The Dark Child The Dark Child is a distinct and graceful memoir of Camara Laye s youth in the village of Koroussa, French Guinea The Dark Child is a distinct and graceful memoir of Camara Laye s youth in the village of Koroussa, French Guinea. The Dark Child The Autobiography of an African Boy The Dark Child is a distinct and graceful memoir of Camara Laye s youth in the village of Koroussa, French Guinea Long regarded Africa s preeminent Francophone novelist, Laye herein marvels over his mother s supernatural powers, his father s distinction as the village goldsmith, and his own passage into manhood, which is marked by animistic beliefs and bloody rituals of primeval origin. The Dark Child Summary eNotes The Dark Child tells the story of the author s youth Yet, the style, structure, and purpose of the book cause it to be classified as a novel as well as an autobiography Camara Laye has molded his The Dark Child Summary Study Guide BookRags Laye s autobiographical novel The Dark Child follows one boy s journey from his earliest memories at age five or six to his first moment of definite adulthood the day he leaves his native Guinea for Paris, where he will study and ultimately decide his destiny. The Dark Child Western Michigan University The Dark Child The theme or idea of education in each novel are also like that of a game, on the side of both European colonizers and native people in each region of Africa With the offer for education comes political, social, and religious strings that create a push and pull between the boys and their families. Dark Child by Jo Raven Dark Child is Mercury s Cosima s story aka DreamBoy CosieCat oh and a cute kitty, Hiccup The twists start right from the beginning when Cos seems to acknowledge Merc one day and totally blank him the next day, this gets answered early into the story, we then see the love build up, the romance and the HAF sex scenes. The Outer Limits Dark Child TV Episode Dark Child A single mother memories of being abducted by aliens resurface when her story appears in a newspaper article Her moody teenage daughter has an English teacher that is helping her, but also seems familiar to her mother. The Dark Child Download Pdf ePub Ebook The Dark Child is a vivid and graceful memoir of Camara Laye s youth in the village of Kouroussa, French Guinea, a place steeped in mystery Laye marvels over his mother s supernatural powers, his father s distinction as the village goldsmith, and his own passage into manhood, which is marked by animistic beliefs and bloody rituals. SparkNotes Child of the Dark Child of the Dark is an autobiography by Carolina Maria de Jesus that was first published in . Rodney Jerkins Rodney Roy Jerkins, also known by his stage name Darkchild, is an American record producer, rapper, and songwriter He has collaborated with a broad range of popular artists, including Brandy, Mary J Blige, Janet Jackson, Whitney Houston, Michael Jackson, Destiny s Child, Monica, Beyonc, Jennifer Lopez, Toni Braxton, Britney Spears, Ludacris, Ciara, Lady Gaga, Baekhyun, and Justin Bieber.

    • [PDF] ↠ Free Download ↠ The Dark Child : by Camara Laye Alfred Ernest Jones James Kirkup Philippe Thoby-Marcellin ·
      269 Camara Laye Alfred Ernest Jones James Kirkup Philippe Thoby-Marcellin
    • thumbnail Title: [PDF] ↠ Free Download ↠ The Dark Child : by Camara Laye Alfred Ernest Jones James Kirkup Philippe Thoby-Marcellin ·
      Posted by:Camara Laye Alfred Ernest Jones James Kirkup Philippe Thoby-Marcellin
      Published :2019-07-12T01:56:27+00:00

    One Reply to “The Dark Child”

    1. Recently I’ve found myself reading a number of memoirs by authors who grew up in various parts of Africa. This one stands out as unique, mostly because it is so unremarkable. There’s no civil war, no violence, no rape. The only bloody scenes are those describing ritual circumcision, and even these showed a communal event of initiation and coming-of-age rather than an act of brutality (as in other books that address the subject). Injustice in society never came forward as a theme. To be hones [...]

    2. This is a fairly short and simple autobiographical account of a boy growing up in Guinea in the 1930s and 40s. Camara Laye wrote it in 1954 while studying in France, and you can feel the nostalgia for his homeland. Although the writing style is quite understated, the emotion is communicated quite effectively, and it’s very moving in places.As the title suggests, the book only deals with his childhood, and it is faithful to a child’s outlook on the world. At the start, his entire world is the [...]

    3. Not much happens in this gentle, sentimental little book, but it’s a pleasant read all the same. There seems to be some disagreement about whether The Dark Child is a memoir or an autobiographical novel; my library shelves it as nonfiction, though given the abundant dialogue, the author clearly took some creative license.Either way, it’s a nicely-written coming-of-age story of a boy from in a traditional village in Guinea in the 1930s and 40s. There are no atrocities, no violence (except fro [...]

    4. The Dark Child Camara Laye ★★★★This is the autobiographical account of the authors experience growing up in a village in French Guinea. Laye shares his childhood with the reader in an open and frank way, he lets us into his family, into his village and into his way of life. Layes childhood is an interesting mix of spiritual traditions and formal religion mixed together in a way that works and that doesn't appear disjointed.An almost poetical story of one boy's childhood this is a read th [...]

    5. This memoir is an enjoyable read that is a picturesque coming of age story set in Africa. It's simply told without artifice or tremendous elaboration. We follow Laye's story as he is raised by his loving parents, attends primary school, falls for his first love, and finally becomes a man through a ritual circumcision. Unfortunately, the book ends on a bittersweet note and left me wanting more. Nicely rendered, but not likely to be memorable.

    6. I used several chapters of this book in my 4AP French classes. I have read the book many times. The book has an outlook which is unique. Camara Laye has a foot in two worlds. We see him as a boy in the villages of his father and grandmother. He opens a window for us into a world where spirits reside in every living thing and where a snake can speak and share knowledge with the leader of a clan.He also shows us his introduction to European science-based culture. And even though the two worlds see [...]

    7. I have always heard of Camara Laye, but never really got to read any of his writing till now. I'm glad I did. This book, detailing the earlier part of his life in the French Gambia is simply amazing. Its writing is brilliant, and there is no doubt it is a book to last. So sad that I still don't know much about what happened from the time he went to France for further education, but Im going to find out. Its similarity to Ngugi's book is that education is given a focal point in his dreams and des [...]

    8. This is a wonderful little book. Why it is on the 1001 books to read list is a mystery to me - I thought that was meant to be a list of novels but this is clearly a childhood memoir.The storytelling is unapologetically sentimental and extremely touching. It is refreshing to read an account of an African childhood not defined by war, the slave trade, famine, or other atrocities. This is a story of family love, deeply entrenched culture and custom, and the pull of a shrinking world in the early / [...]

    9. This was a fascinating memoir of the author's youth growing up in the village of Koroussa, French Guinea. It shows the simple life of a dark child living in the great plain of Guinea. It is a very readable account as his words are rich with sincerity which flows through his language. He wrote this account while attending school in Paris and it is very evident that he was missing his homeland very much. I would recommend this book highly as I found his detailed account of the 'ceremony of the lio [...]

    10. ***A coming-of-age novel, outlining how it was to grow up as a boy in Guinea back in the 30s and 40s. There were several little interesting aspects to this novel, such as the combination of traditional rites within an Islamic environment. But in terms of novels addressing the passage from a colonial/tribal state to the integration into a "civilized"/occidental society, I think that Achebe and Dangaremgba were much better. Cute, but not really exciting.

    11. This book, which I read in one sitting, will always be close to my heart. I identified so much with Camara Laye because of my own firsthand experience of leaving my childhood home post-Katrina, during the time of the New Orleans diaspora. His detailed, slice of life account of the enchanting lives of Muslims in the village of Kouroussa(Guinea--French Africa) was very moving. I can't wait to discuss it in my "Literature of the African Diaspora" class!

    12. This is a good book, a memoir, Camara Laye tells us about his youth in Guinea. He shares with us the culture, family structure, spirituality of his people and his trip towards his own destiny. He wrote this book when he was in his twenties and studying engineering in France. He died in Senegal in 1980.

    13. First book I've read entirely in French, which I'm pretty proud of. It was an easy enough read for someone with 3-4 years of language experience.

    14. I read this for my African Francophone lit class and I believe it was a good introduction to the subject. While others may have been bored by the monotony of the novel, I found it to be interesting, simply because the entire setting was new for me. I have (I'm ashamed to admit it) read very little by African authors and was intrigued by the day to day explanations Laye provided. In class, we did cover criticism of the novel and one of the critiques is that: 'it was a little too good to be true.' [...]

    15. An enjoyable coming of age story about Camara Laye's childhood in French Guinea. Laye takes you through a lot of critical milestones in his life in just a few pages. I didn't realize how much ground he was covering and how quickly he was doing it until I was about 75% through the book. Laye slows down to add detail when it matters and doesn't bog down the story with unnecessary information in other places. The setting makes Laye's life interesting because it is unique and simultaneously undersco [...]

    16. 5 stars because the moment I finished the book I wanted 2 things:- the book to not end, I wanted more! What happened next!!!- to re-read the book once moreautiful!

    17. Laye's brevity and elusiveness on the day to day affairs of his childhood were the biggest failures of the memoir. Written as an explanatory presentation of life in Guinea for the French reader, Laye stresses the humanity his people, the Malinke, to refute the continuing portrayal of Africans as savages during the last decades of colonialism. Even understanding all of this, Laye does not engage the reader to get inside of his head as a child. Throughout, we are given intimations that he somehow [...]

    18. This is a fairly short and simple autobiographical account of a boy growing up in Guinea in the 1930s and 40s. Camara Laye wrote it in 1954 while studying in France, and you can feel the nostalgia for his homeland. Although the writing style is quite understated, the emotion is communicated quite effectively, and it's very moving in places.As the title suggests, the book only deals with his childhood, and it is faithful to a child's outlook on the world. At the start, his entire world is the ver [...]

    19. In the first 90 pages of this book, the great drama involves influential parents intervening to stop schoolyard bullying and in the second 90 pages of this book, the great drama involves the foreskin being chopped from the author's penis. ("Later on, I went through an ordeal much more frightening than Konden Diara, a really dangerous ordeal, and no game: circumcision." Oh my god!!) And in case you were worried that your pulse might slow in the dying chapters of the "novel," in the last fifteen p [...]

    20. In this novel, the author takes us to the African village of his childhood. Ever since (I don't know when) people in the west or north have used some relatively primitive society to reflect their own society. Sometimes, those "alien" societies are populated by noble savages, such as in Rousseau's romantic view of the noble savage. Sometimes that fairly simple formula is broken by more challenging approaches, such as in William Golding's The Lord of the Flies, where British boys turned into savag [...]

    21. This autobiographical novel went out into the world (in 1953) like an ambassador to the French for a francophone African colony. It presents Guinean culture with dignity and affection, and much colourful detail. Laye is at pains to make his readers see beyond apparently strange customs and beliefs and appreciate a shared humanity. This he does well. The book could justly be called a work of propaganda, but worth reading (and quite short) for all that. Such has been its success that it has been a [...]

    22. Camara Laye tells us about the highlights of his childhood in Upper Guinea and later in the capital of Conakry. In so doing he introduces us to the people and culture of his home country. This is a fascinating account of growing up in a tight knit community with strong familial ties, based on a foundation that combines islamic belief with more shamanistic elements. As he lives mostly in town but also visits his mother's family in a more rural area, we get a broader view on the difference between [...]

    23. I first attempted this autobiography in French, when on a Study Abroad in West Africa. In English this time, my own African experience was rediscovered in the description of this boy's childhood in Kouroussa, French Guinea. Though it is a true autobiography, it reads more like a novel -- a story of the coming of age of any African boy.It delivers a taste of cultural customs, religious rites, and a certain manner of conversation that is formal, yet interested, that I also observed while in West A [...]

    24. I first attempted this autobiography in French, when on a Study Abroad in West Africa. In English this time, my own African experience was rediscovered in the description of this boy's childhood in Kouroussa, French Guinea. Though it is a true autobiography, it reads more like a novel -- a story of the coming of age of any African boy.It delivers a taste of cultural customs, religious rites, and a certain manner of conversation that is formal, yet interested, that I also observed while in West A [...]

    25. The only thing that I have to say about this book is that Camara Laye and I have the same mother (maybe it's just an African mom thing, though).That's actually not all I have to say. This book ismething else. It reads fairly quickly and all the questions that Laye asks himself in text just makes it so much more personal rather than all the other autobiographies that I've read where there no feeling or story. This was a story, and a great one at that. I have never related to an author so much as [...]

    Leave a Reply

    Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *