Dreaming Me: An African-American Woman's Buddhist Journey

Dreaming Me An African American Woman s Buddhist Journey The triumphant story of courage and determination Willis writes movingly of surviving a childhood in an Alabama mining camp in the s to become one of the first black students to attend Cornell Un

  • Title: Dreaming Me: An African-American Woman's Buddhist Journey
  • Author: Janice Dean Willis
  • ISBN: 9781573221733
  • Page: 452
  • Format: Hardcover
  • The triumphant story of courage and determination, Willis writes movingly of surviving a childhood in an Alabama mining camp in the 1950s to become one of the first black students to attend Cornell University An early experience of marching with Martin Luther King, Jr in Birmingham sets her on a path of activism, and as so many others did, Willis faced the dilemma of vioThe triumphant story of courage and determination, Willis writes movingly of surviving a childhood in an Alabama mining camp in the 1950s to become one of the first black students to attend Cornell University An early experience of marching with Martin Luther King, Jr in Birmingham sets her on a path of activism, and as so many others did, Willis faced the dilemma of violence or peace in changing the world After nearly joining the Black Panthers, Willis instead set off to India and developed a deep relationship with a Tibetan spiritual master who would forever change her life.

    Tjilbruke Dreaming Tracks kaurnaculture Tjilbruke is pivotal to the creation theories of the Kaurna people He is an important Creation Ancestor in the lore of the Adelaide Plains His tale tells of a time when peaceful laws governed the land and people Tjilbruke lived as a mortal man and was one to whom the law was entrusted Tjilbruke s nephew, Citations ph nglui mglw nafh Cthulhu R lyeh wgah nagl fhtagn Dec , English citations of ph nglui mglw nafh Cthulhu R lyeh wgah nagl fhtagn A fictional occult phrase from H P Lovecraft s The Call of Cthulhu, said to mean In his house at R lyeh dead Cthulhu waits dreaming , H P Lovecraft, The Call of Cthulhu What, in substance, both the Esquimaux wizards and the Louisiana swamp priests had chanted to their

    • [PDF] ô Free Read ↠ Dreaming Me: An African-American Woman's Buddhist Journey : by Janice Dean Willis ✓
      452 Janice Dean Willis
    • thumbnail Title: [PDF] ô Free Read ↠ Dreaming Me: An African-American Woman's Buddhist Journey : by Janice Dean Willis ✓
      Posted by:Janice Dean Willis
      Published :2019-07-05T01:13:21+00:00

    One Reply to “Dreaming Me: An African-American Woman's Buddhist Journey”

    1. Okay, how often has this happened to you? You're walking through the library stacks, or the bookstore, and suddenly a book catches your eye. You pick it up, say, "Hmmmm, this looks interesting." and you bring it home, and it's awesome! That's precisely what happened to me with "Dreaming Me: From Baptist to Buddhist, One Woman's Spiritual Journey".Like many people, I have been intrigued by Buddhism and those who practice it. And, like many, I've dabbled into reading about it, watching videos abou [...]

    2. This title was South Austin Spiritual Book Group's selection for February, 2018, Black History Month. The author even offered to fly in to lead our discussion if I had contacted her earlier.One of the most compelling segments of Jan's whole-life memoir was a decision she made when she was 21. After Jan was invited to be a Black Panther, she had to make the choice to either join the Panthers or return to Nepal. As it turned out, the most important thing was to wait to make that decision. After a [...]

    3. What an amazing life and so inspiring. I've seen her speak a couple of times and she's quite the presence. It is hard to put this down.

    4. The subtitle is deceptively linear. Black Panthers. Tibetan Buddhists. The (ongoing) fight for racial equality for Black Americans. I don't always find "spiritual autobiographies" inspiring, but this one was."What does one do when the oppressor's blood courses in one's own veins? How could I run away from myself? How to make peace with such horrific origins?.Given such history, the questioning of origins, though painful, was unavoidable" (p. 13)."'Again,' [the Dalai Lama] said, 'Patience is most [...]

    5. Up front: I am not a fan, nor inspired by Wallis' religiosity. Her take on tantra and christianity are not my cup of tea! That said, I think this is a valuable work and inspiring memoir of an amazingly intelligent, gifted, strong and determined woman; one that I can imagine being quite inspiring to other women in general, and african-american women in particular, so I heartily recommend it. Even if you are not "religious," I think her story is an important one, written in such a way that keeps o [...]

    6. Dreaming Me by Jan Willis.A brilliant child growing up in the Jim Crow South, Jan Willis escaped the Ku Klux Klan only to face racism of another kind in an Ivy League university. Recruited by the Black Panther Party, she chose instead to travel to India and Nepal, where she encountered Lama Yeshe, a Tibetan monk who would become her mentor and later one of the most influential Buddhist teachers in the West. Through his guidance, Jan Willis learned to face down the demons of her past and embrace [...]

    7. Pretty good read. Willis does a phenomenal job merging the psychological and spiritual effects of race upon the "tender hearted intellectual." I enjoyed her perspective and the way she put into words what is probably very difficult to describe - a transition from the faith of her people to finding a faith that worked for her.

    8. Great book! It's the story of an African-American woman's spiritual journey, away from her Baptist roots, through Buddhism, and into a new space of hospitality for both. I really felt connected to her story of feeling isolated from her identity, even repelled by it; only to learn how to embrace it. GREAT.

    9. Well written autobiography, chronicling the journey from 1950s Alabama to Cornell, to Nepal, and the Tibean Buddhist path. Chilling descriptions of racism, coupled with her own racist generalizations, paints a pretty accurate portrait of the confusing state of race relations amongst her peer group. But that aside, it is a good read.

    10. Interesting that she was a militant Black activist in the late 60s and then became a Buddhist. The writing is not the best ever, but a really worthwhile read and I appreciate the Wesleyan nods :)

    Leave a Reply

    Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *